Victoria Laetae Series - Rome Mint

VICTORIAE LAETAE PRINC PERP

Bust types for this reverse legend:

B5 - Laureate, cuirassed
D6 - Laureate, helmeted, cuirassed
RIC # Issuer Obverse Legend Bust Type Officinae
R P     315
N/A Constantine I IMP CONSTANTINVS P F AVG D6 P
P R     315/317
cf. RIC VII pg. 281 Constantine I CONSTAN_TINVS AVG D6

P

-- Licinius I LICIN_IVS AVG B5

P

This coin is a small module solidus.  It was listed in Patrick Bruun's "Constantinian Chronology" in 1961 and a date of 311/early 312 was proposed to celebrate the victory at the Milvian Bridge.  In 1966, Bruun published RIC VII, which starts with the year 313.  In 1967, C H V Sutherland published RIC VI and proposed a date of 315 for this coin to coincide with Constantine's decennalia.  Since both authors dated the coin to a year not covered by the book they published, the coin missed being published in RIC altogether.  It should be in RIC VII.

I believe this coin may be in the British Museum collection, and I'm working with Mr. Abdy at the BM to get more information on any gold issues they currently hold.

Image courtesy Classical Numismatic Group


Constantine I, AV Aureus or Solidus, 315, Rome
CONSTAN_TINVS AVG
Laureate, helmeted, cuirassed bust right
VICTORIAE LAETAE PRINC PERP
Two Victories standing face to face, holding shield, inscribed VOT | X set on column
PR in exergue
4.39g
RIC VII, -- (cf. RIC VII pg. 281); Depeyrot 18/2; Alföldi 646
Superb EF, very slight wave in flan at edge
Ex CNG; Ex Tkalec (19 February 2001), lot 375

Ex Classical Numismatic Group, Inc. - Sold for $ 7500 in Triton VI, Lot 1086, January 13, 2003.

Image courtesy Lars Ramskold Collection


Licinius I, AV Aureus or Solidus, 317, Rome
LICIN_IVS AVG
Laureate, cuirassed bust right
VICTORIAE LAETAE PRINC PERP
Two Victories, standing facing each other, inscribing shield with VOT | X set on column with garland
PR in exergue
4.597g
RIC VII, --
Lars Ramskold Collection of coins of the Rome Mint

This amazing coin is not mentioned in any publication. The existence of this lone piece, with the shield legend VOT X, is obviously meant to either celebrate Licinius I's decennalia, or a mule reusing a reverse die from Constantine's decennalia in 315.